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What resources are available for dogs that suffer from tummy troubles?

If your dog has tummy troubles, you’re definitely not alone. Your veterinarian should be your first call. There are additional canine resources you can rely on, too.

Consider joining purrch. Here you can connect with other pet parents who know what it's like to deal with canine digestive issues. Ask questions, find support, and get answers from other pet parents and the experts at DIG Labs.

While you are on purrch, consider uploading a picture of your pup's stool sample using the DIG Labs Health Check. This is a convenient and accurate way to get an instant analysis of your dog's stool, including parasites, microbiome, and more from home
 
Finally, you can check out the MiDOG testing kits - an at-home diagnostic tool that uses microbiome analysis to accurately determine what’s causing an infection in your pet. (BTW, it’s not just for dogs—the test works for all pets!) 

You request a kit, collect and send a sample (that’d be your pet’s poop!), and send it in for diagnostic testing. MiDOG sends you the results, which you can then share with your veterinarian to give them a much better picture of what might be causing an infection in your pet and how to treat it efficiently.

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askPurrch information is provided for educational purposes only. Please consult your veterinarian with any questions or concerns you might have regarding your pet’s specific nutritional or health needs. Always ask your veterinarian before feeding your pet anything new.
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Pet Poison Control Hotline
A consultation fee may apply

ASPCA Animal Poison Control: (888) 426-4435

Pet Poison Hotline: (800) 213-6680

Important side note
on pet toxicities

During COVID, as people introduced new substances into their homes, such as baker’s yeast, paint, and vitamin D3, pet poisonings notably increased. Keep your pet safe by avoiding these highly toxic household products.

  • Over-the-counter drugs of all sorts (painkillers, cold medications, dietary supplements, etc.)
  • Insecticides
  • Household plants
  • Household cleaners (including hand sanitizer)
  • Heavy metal including lead, zinc and mercury
  • Fertilizers and other garden-related products
  • Automotive chemicals including antifreeze which is one of the most highly poisonous substances

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Pet Poison Control Hotline
A consultation fee may apply

ASPCA Animal Poison Control: (888) 426-4435

Pet Poison Hotline: (800) 213-6680

Important side note
on pet toxicities

During COVID, as people introduced new substances into their homes, such as baker’s yeast, paint, and vitamin D3, pet poisonings notably increased. Keep your pet safe by avoiding these highly toxic household products.

  • Over-the-counter drugs of all sorts (painkillers, cold medications, dietary supplements, etc.)
  • Insecticides
  • Household plants
  • Household cleaners (including hand sanitizer)
  • Heavy metal including lead, zinc and mercury
  • Fertilizers and other garden-related products
  • Automotive chemicals including antifreeze which is one of the most highly poisonous substances